Discussion:
How the Doppler Effect Refutes Einstein
(trop ancien pour répondre)
Pentcho Valev
2017-05-22 17:30:27 UTC
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Setup:

A light source emits a series of pulses equally distanced from one another. A stationary observer (receiver) measures the frequency:

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The observer starts moving with constant speed towards the light source and measures the frequency again:

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Premise 1: The moving observer measures the frequency to be higher.

Premise 2: The formula

(measured frequency) = (speed of the pulses relative to the observer)/(distance between the pulses)

is correct.

Conclusion: The speed of the pulses relative to the moving observer is higher than relative to the stationary observer. In other words, the speed of light varies with the speed of the observer, in violation of Einstein's relativity.

Pentcho Valev
Pentcho Valev
2017-05-22 22:14:47 UTC
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Stephen Hawking, "A Brief History of Time", Chapter 3: "Now imagine a source of light at a constant distance from us, such as a star, emitting waves of light at a constant wavelength. Obviously the wavelength of the waves we receive will be the same as the wavelength at which they are emitted (the gravitational field of the galaxy will not be large enough to have a significant effect). Suppose now that the source starts moving toward us. When the source emits the next wave crest it will be nearer to us, so the distance between wave crests will be smaller than when the star was stationary." http://www.fisica.net/relatividade/stephen_hawking_a_brief_history_of_time.pdf

This interpretation, universally taught by Einsteinians, implies that the speed of the wavecrests relative to the moving source is smaller than c - unlike the stationary source, the moving source is chasing the fleeing wavecrest. Accordingly, the following argument is valid:

Premise 1: The speed of the wavecrests relative to both the stationary and the moving source is c.

Premise 2: The frequency measured by the observer is higher when the source is moving toward the observer.

Conclusion: The moving source does not emit shorter wavelength - rather, it emits faster light. If the speed of the moving source is v, the speed of the light relative to the observer is c'=c+v. In other words, the speed of light varies with the speed of the source, as predicted by Newton's emission theory of light and in violation of Einstein's relativity.

Pentcho Valev
Pentcho Valev
2017-05-23 07:42:08 UTC
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The speed of light varies with the speed of the observer - this is so obvious that Einsteinians often suggest it explicitly, thereby unconsciously repudiating Einstein's relativity:

Albert Einstein Institute: "In this particular animation

http://www.einstein-online.info/images/spotlights/doppler/doppler_detector_blue.gif

which has the receiver moving towards the source at one third the speed of the pulses themselves, four pulses are received in the time it takes the source to emit three pulses." http://www.einstein-online.info/spotlights/doppler

Since "four pulses are received in the time it takes the source to emit three pulses", the speed of the pulses relative to the receiver (observer) is greater than their speed relative to the source, in violation of Einstein's relativity.

Pentcho Valev

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