Discussion:
The Simplest Disproof of Einstein's Relativity
(trop ancien pour répondre)
Pentcho Valev
2017-02-13 08:45:30 UTC
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Special Relativity Lecture: 6 Einstein's Two Postulates Explaination

My comment on YouTube:

Einstein's assumption that the speed of light is constant (independent of the speed of source or observer) is OBVIOUSLY false. When the initially stationary observer starts moving towards the light source with speed v, the frequency he measures shifts from f=c/λ to f'=(c+v)/λ (Doppler effect). This means that either the speed of the light relative to the observer shifts from c to c'=c+v, which is fatal for Einstein's relativity, or the motion of the observer somehow changes the wavelength of the incoming light - the wavelength shifts from λ to λ'=λc/(c+v). The latter scenario is absurd - the motion of the observer is obviously unable to change the wavelength of the incoming light.

Conclusion: The speed of light is different for differently moving observers (varies with the speed of the observer), in violation of Einstein's relativity.

Pentcho Valev
Pentcho Valev
2017-02-13 17:10:35 UTC
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Any correct interpretation of the Doppler effect unequivocally disproves Einstein's relativity:

http://www.einstein-online.info/spotlights/doppler
Albert Einstein Institute: "The frequency of a wave-like signal - such as sound or light - depends on the movement of the sender and of the receiver. This is known as the Doppler effect. [...] Here is an animation of the receiver moving towards the source:

Loading Image... (stationary receiver)

Loading Image... (moving receiver)

By observing the two indicator lights, you can see for yourself that, once more, there is a blue-shift - the pulse frequency measured at the receiver is somewhat higher than the frequency with which the pulses are sent out. This time, the distances between subsequent pulses are not affected, but still there is a frequency shift: As the receiver moves towards each pulse, the time until pulse and receiver meet up is shortened. In this particular animation, which has the receiver moving towards the source at one third the speed of the pulses themselves, four pulses are received in the time it takes the source to emit three pulses." [end of quotation]

Since "four pulses are received in the time it takes the source to emit three pulses", the speed of the pulses relative to the receiver (observer) is greater than their speed relative to the source, in violation of Einstein's relativity.

Pentcho Valev
Pentcho Valev
2017-02-13 19:26:57 UTC
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When the initially stationary observer starts moving towards the light source with speed v, the frequency he measures becomes

f' = (c+v)/λ

http://www.hep.man.ac.uk/u/roger/PHYS10302/lecture18.pdf
"Moving Observer. Now suppose the source is fixed but the observer is moving towards the source, with speed v. In time t, ct/λ waves pass a fixed point. A moving point adds another vt/λ. So f'=(c+v)/λ."

On the other hand, the speed of the light relative to the moving observer is

c' = λf'

Combining the two formulas gives

c' = c+v

in violation of Einstein's relativity.

Barlow's lecture quoted above introduces relativistic corrections (time dilation) and the frequency measured by the moving observer becomes

f' = γ(c+v)/λ

The speed of the light relative to the moving observer is, accordingly,

c' = λf' = γ(c+v)

Clearly, Einstein's relativity is violated even if the relativistic corrections are taken into account.

In order to prevent Divine Albert's Divine Theory from collapsing, clever Einsteinians avoid the dangerous formula

f' = γ(c+v)/λ

and teach the equivalent relation

f'/f = sqrt((1+v/c)/(1-v/c))

where the variation of the speed of light is somewhat hidden. Silly Einsteinians (99%) learn the last relation by rote and sing "Divine Einstein", "Yes we all believe in relativity, relativity, relativity" and "The faster you move, the heavier you get":

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"No-one's as dee-vine as Albert Einstein not Maxwell, Curie, or Bohr! His fame went glo-bell, he won the Nobel - He should have been given four! No-one's as dee-vine as Albert Einstein, Professor with brains galore! No-one could outshine Professor Einstein! He gave us special relativity, That's always made him a hero to me! No-one's as dee-vine as Albert Einstein, Professor in overdrive!"


Max Tegmark: "We all believe in relativity, relativity, relativity. Yes we all believe in relativity, relativity, relativity. Everything is relative, even simultaneity, and soon Einstein's become a de facto physics deity. 'cos we all believe in relativity, relativity, relativity. We all believe in relativity, relativity, relativity. Yes we all believe in relativity, relativity, relativity."


Michio Kaku, Brian Cox, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Brian Greene, Lisa Randall: "Now, listen carefully. The faster you move, the heavier you get. Light travels at the same speed no matter how you look at it. No matter how I move relative to you light travels at the same speed. No matter who is doing the measurement and no matter what direction you are moving the speed of light is the same. The speed of light is the same no matter what direction or how fast... As you travel faster time slows down. Everything slows down. Everything slows down. Time slows down when you move. Time passes at a different rate. Clocks run slow. It's a monumental shift in how we see the world. It's a beautiful piece of science. It's a beautifully elegant theory. It's a beautiful piece of science. It's a beautiful piece..."

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"The Riverside Church in New York, west portal - upper line, second of right. In 1930, during a stay in New York, Albert Einstein and his wife visited the Riverside Church, too. During the detailed guided tour through the church Einstein was also shown the sculptures at the west portal. He was told that only one of the sculptures there represented a living person, and that was he himself. What Einstein is supposed to have thought in that moment when he heard that information and saw himself immortalized in stone? Contemporaries reported that he looked at the sculpture calmly and thoughtfully."

Pentcho Valev

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